Big Ben with Houses of Parliament in London.

London

 
Portobello Market

Portobello Market

Portobello Market is a popular street market in the lovely setting of Notting Hill. Over 1,000 antique dealers are lined up on Portobello Road on Saturdays, which is the main day of the market when all the antique arcades are open. Even if you weren’t immediately looking for antiques, the cheerful atmosphere of this market amidst the little colorful houses of Portobello Road is worth exploring – but note that you won’t be alone here, especially on Saturdays! Portobello Market also works on other days of the week, but then on a limited scale – have a look at the official website for all the detail. Get directions.

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St Paul's Cathedral

St Paul's Cathedral

At the highest point in London, on Ludgate Hill, stands the St Paul's Cathedral. It is the largest Anglican church in Europe and the seat of the Bishop of London. The opening date of the cathedral is considered to be October 20, 1708, taking into account that this was already the fifth church built on this site – the previous versions were either destroyed or burned.


To see the cathedral from the inside, you’ll need a ticket that you can buy online or on the spot – note that the regular price is around € 23. The St Paul's Cathedral is open every day, but Sunday is reserved for worshipping. Get directions.

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Natural History Museum in London

Natural History Museum

From the outside the Museum of Natural History resembles a magnificent cathedral but going inside we immediately dive into the kingdom of nature. In the central hall, we are met by a huge skeleton of a blue whale, which replaced the famous skeleton of the Diplodocus. The collection has more than 70 million exhibits, including plants, animal specimens, insects, 500 thousand stones and minerals, including meteorites, and paleontological exhibits with the famous collection of dinosaur skeletons.


The museum works daily and is free of charge. Get directions.

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Big Ben

Big Ben

The Big Ben is the well-known nickname of the 96-metre clock tower of the Houses of Parliament. It was officially renamed Elizabeth Tower in 2012, to mark the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II. Ever since May 1859, the Big Ben has kept the exact time for the nation. Unfortunately, it will be covered with scaffolding till 2021 due to restoration works. Get directions.

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Find a place near the Big Ben.
Shopping in Camden High Street in London

Camden High Street

Camden High Street is the central street of the lively Camden Town, dotted with small colourful shops, market stalls, cafés and street food stands. The street is known for its alternative fashion, record stores, vintage clothes, crafts and jewellery. The atmosphere is always lively and down to earth. Get directions.

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Victoria Tower Gardens

Victoria Tower Gardens

Victoria Tower Gardens is a little lawn sided by large trees in central London. During the warmer months you will see people relaxing on the grass, or having a break on one of the benches at the Thames riverside. What makes the place so special is the magnificent surrounding architecture of Westminster Palace. With the Gothic Buxton Memorial Fountain and the sculpture The Burghers of Calais by Auguste Rodin, the gardens contain some outstanding monuments.


Please note that the gardens close at night. Get directions.

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Borough Market

Borough Market

The first market on the place of the modern Borough Market opened in the 11th century. Its location was justified by its proximity to the London Bridge, which has been the only river crossing into the city for a long time. Today the market is a lively place, where you can buy fresh farm products, fruits, drinks, bread, pastries and much more.


Borough Market is closed on Sundays – please note that only a limited number of stalls work on Mondays and Tuesdays. Have a look at the official website to learn more about Borough Market and its stalls. Get directions.

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Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey was first built in the 7th century. It expanded many times, with the final touch made in English Gothic style, as completed in 1745. It became a symbol of the British nation, as all monarchs starting from 1066 were crowned here. The church is exceptional not only for its architecture, but also for the amount of famous people buried here, including Queen Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria, Charles Darwin, Neville Chamberlain and Isaac Newton to name a few.


You can visit the abbey all days except Sunday (only for worshipping), with regular tickets priced around € 25. Get directions.

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Shopping in Regent Street in London

Regent Street

Regent Street is a curved street in central London with fantastic Beaux-Arts architecture from late 19th century. On Regent Street you will find luxury and mainstream brands next to each other. Here you can find Furla, Michael Kors, Burberry, Uniqlo, Zara and many others. Fans of Apple cannot miss the first Apple Store in Europe, and one of the world's largest. Worth mentioning is also the magnificent Hamleys toy store, a mecca for children. Get directions.

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The Charles Dickens Museum in London

Charles Dickens Museum

The House Museum of Dickens is dedicated to the author of such famous works as Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, A Tale of Two Cities, The Pickwick Papers and many others that brought him fame and recognition. This is the only house that has survived to our time, where the writer Charles Dickens and his wife once lived. Historians have recreated the authentic atmosphere of Dickens’ house with genuine objects that once belonged to the writer.


The museum is closed on Mondays and admission is paid. Get directions.

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St James's Square

St James's Square

St James's Square is a lovely little oasis with dense vegetation and flowerbeds in the heart of London. It is one of London’s earliest garden squares, dating back to 1670. The shaded square is surrounded by stately architecture. The buildings here have had many illustrious residents. During WWII Charles de Gaulle and Dwight Eisenhouwer had their headquarters located here. In the middle of the square there’s an equestrian statue of King William III.


The square is open to the public on weekdays until 16h. Get directions.

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Duke of York Square Food Market

Duke of York Square Food Market

This small open-air market on the lively Duke of York Square offers a wide range of tasty delights, mostly from local farmers. Find here meat, fish, bread, cakes, delicacies and fine street food. In addition, nice small cafés and boutiques can be found all around the square.


The food market is organized every Saturday, from 10h to 16h. Visit the official website for more info about the Duke of York Square and its market. Get directions.

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Tower of London

Tower of London

The Tower of London is the real heart of Great Britain, as originally built by William the Conqueror in 1078. During its existence the Tower served as a defensive structure, a prison, a mint, a palace and a repository of royal treasures. Today in its museum, guides dressed in the Victorian era style, tell about the nearly 1,000-year history of the Tower and England. You will also see black ravens living here, and there is a belief that when the last raven leaves the Tower, the British monarchy will fall. Why? Find it out in the museum, which is open every day. Get directions.

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Oxford Street

Oxford Street

Oxford Street is one of Europe's busiest shopping streets, of nearly 2.5 km long. For a long period, nobody wanted to be there, as Oxford Street was notorious for its public executions. After some traders had made the bet to open their shops here, the street began to develop as a shopping area. When the gallows were finally removed in 1783, the street really started blossoming. Get directions.

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Richmond Park

Richmond Park

Richmond Park is the largest of the royal parks. Since the 17th century the park is enclosed by a 13-km wall, as the private hunting ground of Charles I. Today you will still see wild deer here, grazing warily under shaded trees, some of which 700 years old. The grounds of Richmond Park are excellent for long walks or cycling. If you’re not into active leisure, try to catch some fish in the Pen Ponds, or have a picnic at the Isabella Plantation, where azaleas and rhododendrons bloom during the warmer months.


The park can be visited till dusk. Get directions.

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10 Downing Street

10 Downing Street

10 Downing Street or simply “Number 10”, as the British often say, has been the permanent official residence and office of the British Prime Minister since 1735. Unfortunately, you can’t visit it from the inside, but through the official website, you can explore it on a virtual tour. In addition, here lives the country's most famous cat with the official title of Chief Mouser to the Cabinet Office. Today the position is held by Larry, who has served already since 2011. Get directions.

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Jubilee Gardens

Jubilee Gardens

The Jubilee Gardens on the south bank of the Thames river were opened to mark Queen Elizabeth’s silver jubilee on the throne. The green space features little hills, flower beds and more than a hundred trees, including English oaks, one of the symbols of Great Britain. It is a wonderful place to have a rest in the grass, especially as from here you will get an incredible close-up view of the London Eye.


The Jubilee Gardens can be visited any time of the day. Get directions.

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Buckingham Palace London

Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace is one of the few operating royal palaces in the modern world and is the residence of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. During August and September, when the queen leaves, it becomes accessible to visitors. Changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace is also one of the most recognizable ceremonies in the world. It takes place daily at 11.30h from April to August, and the rest of the year – every other day. The official website provides further information about visiting hours. Get directions.

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Shopping in Carnaby Street in London

Carnaby Street

Carnaby Street is a pedestrianized shopping street in Soho, known for its 1960s spirit. Here you can find lifestyle stores as well as independent fashion shops, vintage boutiques and record stores. Be sure to stroll along the small side alleys, as there are many trendy places hidden away from the main pedestrian zone of Carnaby Street. Get directions.

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Find a place near Brixton Market.
Churchill War Rooms

Churchill War Rooms

Churchill War Rooms is the former secret headquarters of Prime Minister Winston Churchill. This underground shelter was built in 1939 for cabinet meetings regarding the course of WWII. It has been used for its intended purpose until Japan surrendered in 1945. The most famous part of the bunker is the Prime Minister’s apartment. This is one room, combining an office and a bedroom, as well as the funniest exhibit, a night pot.


You can visit the bunker museum every day – admission is paid. Get directions.

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Shopping Around Covent Garden in London

Covent Garden area

The Covent Garden district is known as very lively and diverse. The same can be said for shopping here, as there is something for every taste and budget. There are expensive boutiques, affordable international brands, gift shops, quirky stores, and of course the fashionable Apple Market. All you need whilst exploring Covent Garden is time to see it all. Get directions.

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Tate Modern

Tate Modern

Tate Modern is the modern part of the Tate British art museum, located on the territory of the former Bankside Power Station. Only contemporary and modern art created no earlier than 1900 is exhibited here, in such genres as impressionism, abstractionism, cubism, surrealism and pop art. In Tate Modern you will find works of most notably Picasso, Matisse, Kandinsky, Malevich, Warhol and many others. Tate Modern often hosts contemporary installations and performances as well.


The museum is free of charge and can be visited every day. Get directions.

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Shakespeare's Globe

Shakespeare's Globe

Today's Globe Theatre is the third theatre of its kind. The first one was built in 1599 at the expense of the troupe, whose shareholder was the great poet William Shakespeare. The building was destroyed by fire after 14 years of its existence. The newly rebuilt theatre was razed to the ground in 1644. Only in 1997, the theatre again opened its doors. It was designed to resemble Shakespeare's one. There is no artificial lighting and all performances take place in the daytime.


Check out the official website for the agenda and tickets. Get directions.

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Whitehall Gardens

Whitehall Gardens

Whitehall Gardens is a calm and neat green space with plenty of benches in a busy part of central London. It is decorated with beautiful flowerbeds and a wide variety of trees, including palm trees. One of the sculptures here is dedicated to William Tyndale, a famous philosopher who first translated the New Testament into English, an effort for which he got executed. All along one side of the gardens, you will see the magnificent facade of the 19th century Whitehall Court.


The Whitehall Gardens are open any time of the day. Get directions.

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London Transport Museum

London Transport Museum

The London Transport Museum has over 450 thousand exhibits. Apart from photos and documents, you can see old carriages, omnibuses, and explore early versions of the famous double-decker buses. An entire floor is dedicated to the “tube”, which is the very first underground system in the world.


Another cool thing the museum offers are the Hidden Tours, on which you can explore disused tube stations and tunnels throughout London with a guide. Have a look at the official website to see what tours are being offered. The museum is open every day and admission is paid. Get directions.

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Royal Albert Hall

Royal Albert Hall

Queen Victoria and her husband, Prince Albert, had a very strong and happy marriage. After Albert’s death, Victoria tried to finish all the projects that the prince considered important, and the Royal Albert Hall was one of them. He proposed the construction of a permanent concert and exhibition complex after the Great Exhibition of London in 1851. And although Albert did not see it during his lifetime, his idea was realized with today still the best concerts and events of Great Britain held here.


Check out the official website to see what’s on. Get directions.

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The Science Museum in London

Science Museum

The Museum of Science was founded in 1857, initially supplied with exhibits displayed at the Great Exhibition of 1851. Today on its five floors there are more than 250,000 objects dedicated to various areas of science and technology. There are old steam locomotives, aeroplanes, helicopters, medical instruments, watches, cameras, communication systems – in other words, a world of gadgets and inventions.


The museum is open daily and free of charge. Get directions.

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Find a place near the Big Ben.
Hampstead Heath

Hampstead Heath

Hampstead Heath is reaching English countryside with London public transport. It is wilderness, landscaped parks, and magnificent views over London from Parliament Hill. The 320 hectares are excellent for endless walks through sloping hills, or bicycle tours. Not to mention all the picturesque ponds, which invite for a swim on hot days. Among the fifty places of archaeological and historical value in Hampstead Heath, are the 17th-century Kenwood House and the 19th-century Athlone House. Visit the official website for more info. Get directions.

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Maltby Street Market

Maltby Street Market

Maltby Street Market is a hotspot for foodies, first opened in 2010. Located under the arches of the railway between London and Greenwich, the market breathes a cool and urban atmosphere. There’s plenty of stands here selling delicious snacks to go, little restaurants with terraces, as well as stalls selling cheese, bread and pastries from local producers.


Maltby Street Market works on Fridays from 12.30-14h, on Saturdays from 10-17h and on Sundays from 11-16h. Have a look at the official website for an introduction to the traders. Get directions.

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The Royal Greenwich Observatory

Royal Greenwich Observatory

The Royal Greenwich Observatory is one of the oldest institutions in the world, founded in 1674. Today it no longer works for its intended purpose but serves as a museum of astronomy and navigation. Here you will see the first marine chronometers invented by John Harrison back in the 18th century. And they still work! The strange red ball on the facade has been present since 1833, when the astronomer John Pond put it there. Every day at 13h this time ball dropped down, giving sailors a sign to check their ship’s chronometers. As a tradition, it is still set to happen this way every day.


The observatory can be visited every day. Get directions.

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Shopping in Sloane Street in London

Sloane Street

Sloane Street is one of London's main luxury shopping streets. It is the calmer and more expensive alternative to shopping at Brompton Road. On Sloane Street you will find all the luxury fashion and jewellery stores, including Louis Vuitton, Moncler, Omega, Gucci and Fendi. Get directions.

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Tower Bridge

Tower Bridge

The Tower Bridge is perhaps the most iconic sight of London, built in 1894. The Victorian drawbridge originally used steam engines to pull the roadway up, when large ships had to pass. In 1976 the system was electrified, with the old Victorian engine rooms open to visitors as part of the Tower Bridge Exhibition. Via the exhibition you can also access the glass-floored high-level walkways of the Tower Bridge, which provide a cool birds-eye view of London.


Have a look at the official website for more visitor info. Get directions.

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Camden Lock Market in London

Camden Lock

Camden Lock Market which opened in 1973, was initially a small crafts market populated by a number of craftsmen and artists. Today, Camden Lock is a whole complex of mini-markets where you will find alternative fashion and handmade vintage clothes, jewellery and trinkets, vinyl records, works of photographers and many other things – like excellent street food, cosy restaurants and hip cafés.


Camden Lock is open every day. Visit the official website for the latest news. Get directions.

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Hyde Park

Hyde Park

Hyde Park is a traditional resting place for Londoners and tourists. Here it’s pleasant to go jogging, cycling, to simply relax on the benches, or to have a picnic near the Serpentine lake. Just south of the Serpentine, you will find the Memorial Fountain of Princess Diana, who used to live in Kensington Palace. Another highlight in Hyde Park is the Speakers’ Corner from 1872, which provides a stage for anyone who likes to ventilate his or her ideas – for most fireworks, consider going on Sundays.


The royal park is open daily from early morning till night. Get directions.

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The Temple Church in London

Temple Church

The Temple Church was built in 1185 by the Knights Templar. In their vision, the rotunda symbolizes the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. This unique structure survived the Great Fire of London but nevertheless suffered from an air raid during WWII. The place has gotten increasingly popular after being mentioned in the Da Vinci Code book and movie.


Today the restored church can be visited on weekdays, for a fee of around € 7. Get directions.

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Highgate Cemetery in London

Highgate Cemetery

Highgate Cemetery opened in 1839 to become one of the most famous Victorian cemeteries in England. The cemetery is popular with tourists because it is not just a burial place, but a magnificent park with unique flora and fauna, Gothic crypts and tombs, the most famous of which is the tomb of Karl Marx. Be sure to stroll the western part to see the magnificent funerary architecture of the Egyptian Avenue and the Circle of Lebanon.


Please note that the entrance to the cemetery is paid. Have a look at the official website to find more information about guided tours. Get directions.

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Local experience at Bushy Park.
The Shard

The Shard

The Shard is an original skyscraper that was erected by the beginning of the 2012 Olympic Games. The 309-metre glass pyramid combines offices, a luxury hotel, several floors of apartments, restaurants and an observation deck, which occupies the 68th up to the 72nd floor. In addition to offering breathtaking panoramas over London, the observation deck is equipped with special tablets via which you can zoom in on objects to get interesting information about them.


Visit the official website to book a ticket or to reserve a table. Get directions.

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Bank of England Museum

Bank of England Museum

The Bank of England Museum covers an area of 10,000 sq. m. and is housed in a renovated building from the late 18th century. The exhibition halls tell about the history of the world's first state-owned bank in chronological order since its foundation in 1694. The section called ‘The Bank Today’, is dedicated to the stock market. There are interactive games for children of various ages, explaining how money is made and what the bank does in general.


Visits to the museum are free and possible on weekdays. Get directions.

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Battersea Park in London

Battersea Park

Before opening as a public park in 1858, Battersea Park was used for growing vegetables due to its fertile soil. London’s second public park contains a man-made boating lake, little waterfalls and several styled gardens, including a small subtropical garden with magnificent palm trees, evergreen oaks and ferns. One of the eyecatchers is the Buddhist Peace Pagoda, a 35-metre monument built by Buddhist monks and nuns.


The park is open daily until dusk. Get directions.

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The Old Spitalfields Market in London

Old Spitalfields Market

Under the roof of the Old Spitalfields Market you will find fashionable clothes from independent designers, antiques and countless hand-made products. The stylish market hall from 1887 also offers a good number of boutiques and restaurants.


The Old Spitalfields Market is open every day of the week, with Thursdays especially good for antiques and Fridays for fashion. Have a look at the official website to get introduced to the traders. Get directions.

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The Kensington Gardens in London

Kensington Gardens

The Kensington Gardens were originally part of Hyde Park, nowadays only separated through a narrow road. The gardens are the charming decoration of Kensington Palace, where Queen Victoria was born and Princess Diana lived. There is always a pleasant atmosphere in this royal park, no matter if you sit on the grass near the Round Pond, rent a bicycle, or stroll past its grand monuments like the Albert Memorial and the Peter Pan Statue. Recently, small parakeets have settled here and you can feed them along the Long Water Lake.


The park is open daily until sunset. Get directions.

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Shopping in Liberty London

Liberty (Department Store)

The Libеrty department store appears more like a museum. It is located in a wooden mansion from the 19th century, which treasures old fireplaces, huge mirrors in carved frames and luxurious staircases. The place offers exclusive fashion brands and perfumes, but also delicacies like tea, coffee and chocolate.


Check out the official website to get an overview of the brands. Liberty is open daily. Get directions.

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The Houses of Parliament in London

Palace of Westminster / Houses of Parliament

The gorgeous Palace of Westminster has had a turbulent history with fires, explosions and bombings. Initially a palace for monarchs, it was after the Fire of 1512 that the Parliament of the UK started to work from here. The neo-Gothic building contains more than 1,000 rooms and 100 stairways, and hardly anyone has passed through them all.


The Parliament offers guided tours on Saturdays and on days when it is not in session. Tickets can be purchased online or visit the ticket office, located in front of the Portcullis House on Victoria Embankment – get directions.

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Brick Lane Market in London

Brick Lane Market

Brick Lane Market is a street market in the urban and cool environment of Brick Lane. It is a place to find vintage clothes from the 1920s to the 1990s, unique designer’s accessories, vinyl and many lovely trinkets. But most importantly, you can try delicious local street food while searching for your hidden gems.


Brick Lane Market takes place every week on Sundays. Get directions.

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Lord's Cricket Ground in London

Lord's Cricket Ground

The construction of the Lord's Cricket Ground dates back to 1814. The place is also known as the Home of Cricket, as it houses the largest library and the oldest museum in the world with a huge and rare collection of memorabilia dedicated to this sport. Films about the history of this fascinating game, so popular in Britain, are constantly on display here. Guided tours are being offered daily and give a behind-the-scenes look at the Home of Cricket – check out the official website for further details. Get directions.

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Bushy Park in London

Bushy Park

Those who love exploring nature will surely enjoy the beautiful rural and enchanting landscapes of Bushy Park. The park has a good population of noble deer, grey herons and blackbirds. Don’t miss the Diana fountain, built in the 17th century to welcome guests of Hampton Court Palace. Another delightful attraction here, is the Baroque style water garden, with picturesque cascades and pools.


Bushy Park is open daily till late evening. Get directions.

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Find a place in the City.
The Imperial War Museum in London

Imperial War Museum

The vast collection of the Imperial War Museum covers the history of military conflicts in which Great Britain and the countries of the Commonwealth took part from the beginning of the 20th century up to the present day. The largest sections of the exposition are devoted to military equipment used in the world wars and a collection of photo documents and newsreels in the Photography Archive.


The museum is open every day and is free of charge. Get directions.

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Cutty Sark in London

Cutty Sark

It is impossible to imagine England without tea, and Cutty Sark was one of the most important merchant ships that brought it from China. It got its name after the witch from the poem Tam o' Shanter – for others to stay away from it, as the ship promised notoriety. Eventually Cutty Sark spent nearly 150 years at service to become one of the last tea clippers. Today you can walk along its decks and inspect its fantastic gilded underwater part.


The museum ship is closed on Mondays. Get directions.

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Museum of London Docklands

Museum of London Docklands

The prosperity of London has always depended on commerce. The Museum of London Docklands tells the story of the port starting from Roman times until the 1970s, when the docks were closed. The museum itself is located in a former sugar warehouse building. Inside, you will learn not only about the history of the coffee and sugar trade and the life of whalers, but also about what happened during the slave trade.


The museum is open daily and free of charge. Get directions.

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Shopping in Selfridges in London

Selfridges (Department Store)

Selfridges & Co is one of the most popular department stores in London. Across six floors there’s fashion, cosmetics and perfumes, furniture and interior items, all from expensive as well as affordable brands. What’s more, there’s a foodhall with exclusive British delicacies as well as several restaurants on site.


Visit the official website to get an overview of the brands, products and restaurants. Selfridges is open every day of the week. Get directions.

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Greenwich Market

Greenwich Market

Greenwich Market exists already since the 18th century. It is a covered market with more than 100 stalls offering a wide selection of products. The market is especially strong on arts and handmades, alternative clothes and vintage, antiques and books. Numerous stalls and little cafés offer exotic snacks and sweets, as well as traditional English dishes. Greenwich Market works every day.


Check out the official website to explore the stalls here. Get directions.

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London City Hall

London City Hall

This glass egg on the banks of the Thames is not a contemporary art gallery, but the residence of the Mayor of London, the City Hall. Inside, all 10 floors are connected by a futuristic helical staircase. At the very top you’ll find "London's Living Room", a conference room with a gallery where free art and thematic exhibitions are held from time to time.


Accessing the City Hall is free from Monday to Friday, but note that you will have to present your ID upon entrance – have a look at the official website for more visitor info. Get directions.

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The Somerset House in London

Somerset House

The Somerset House is one of the most beautiful and largest buildings from the eighteenth century. By that time there was a big need for accommodating government offices and for this purpose, the Somerset House was erected in 1796. It served its initial purpose right until 1997, after which it was turned into a cultural center. Today it houses the Courtauld Institute of Art with a collection of impressionists, the Gilbert Collection of decorative art, and also expositions of The Hermitage in St Petersburg.


The house is free of charge and open every day. Get directions.

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Tate Britain

Tate Britain

A personal collection once owned by the industrialist Sir Henry Tate formed the basis of what became the world's largest collection of English art from the 16th to the 20th centuries. In Tate Britain you will see romantic landscapes, mystical paintings, engravings and watercolours, as well as portraits of nobles and monarchs arranged in chronological order from 1500 to 1900. Works of later date are presented in the second part of the museum, which is called Tate Modern.


The museum is free of charge and can be visited every day. Get directions.

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St James's Park in London

St James's Park

St James's Park is one of the oldest British parks, created in the time of Queen Elizabeth I. Just a short walk from the noisy streets of central London, and you are already in the middle of marvelous nature. Fifteen species of birds live on its lake, including pelicans, which are solemnly fed daily at 14:30h. Some parts of St James's Park might seem familiar to you, as the park was featured in various films and series like 101 Dalmatians, James Bond and Sherlock.


Please note that the park closes at night. Get directions.

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Shopping in Oxford Street in London

Shopping in Oxford Street

Oxford Street is definitely the busiest street in London, perhaps due to the 300 shops that are located along its 2 kilometers. The street is home to dozens of internationally leading fashion brands. On the western side of Oxford Street, you will find several department stores, such as Selfridges and the House of Fraser. Get directions.

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Victoria and Albert Museum

Victoria and Albert Museum

The Victoria and Albert Museum is considered the largest museum of decorative arts in the world, with 4.5 million exhibits in its collection. They cover the 5000-year history of almost all cultures of the world, showing ceramics, furniture, fashion items, glasswork, jewellery, photographs, sculptures, fabrics and paintings from the ancient Egyptians up to the present day.


The museum works daily and is free of charge. Get directions.

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St Paul's Churchyard

St Paul's Churchyard

Located in one of London’s busiest areas, the shaded St Paul's Churchyard is surprisingly quiet. The church grounds were first opened to the public in 1878. There’s plenty of benches to take a rest and enjoy the moment next to the majestic St Paul's Cathedral.


The churchyard is free to visit in summer until 20.30h and in winter until 16h. Get directions.

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The Wellington Arch in London

Wellington Arch

The Wellington Arch was erected in 1825 by the order of King George IV and was dedicated to the victory of the British forces under the command of the Duke of Wellington over Napoleon's army. Inside, there is an exposition dedicated to the war and in particular the Battle of Waterloo, whose 200th anniversary was celebrated in 2015. From the very top of the arch, you can get a nice view of the surrounding parks. The exhibition is open daily, with tickets priced at around € 8. Get directions.

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Mary Axe Building

Mary Axe Building

The 40-story skyscraper Mary Axe or 30 St Mary Axe is nicknamed after the street where it is located, as its official name is The Gherkin. And all because it has a shape similar to a vegetable. Against the backdrop of ancient buildings in central London, it could also be an alien ship. The remarkable building appeared in the recent Bond movie Spectre, where it served as the headquarters of the British intelligence service. The three floors at the top of the building are in use by restaurants and cafés. Get directions.

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Primrose Hill in London

Primrose Hill

Primrose Hill is a grassy hill north of Regent's Park. Most likely, the hill acquired its name thanks to primroses blooming on its slopes. In the 16th century the hill was part of the hunting grounds of Henry VIII, back then populated by deer and wild boars. In the middle of the 19th century, Primrose Hill was turned into a public park, and became a favorite for watching great panoramas over London. In fine weather, from here you can see the Big Ben, the London Eye and many skyscrapers.


Primrose Hill can be visited any hour of the day. Get directions.

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Broadway Market in London

Broadway Market

Broadway Market is a vibrant place in an area that breathes the rest of a village. The market is known for its quality and specialty products like organic meat and sausages, cheese, fresh fish, fruitcakes and bread, but also vintage clothes, furniture, handmade brooches and more.


Broadway Market operates every week on Saturdays. Visit the official website to learn more about the market. Get directions.

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Brockwell Park in London

Brockwell Park

Recognized as a Site of Importance for Nature Conservation, the area of Brockwell Park is an amazing place to have a rest. Here you can enjoy sitting under the leaves of centuries-old oak trees, play tennis or explore local greenhouses. You can arrange a picnic in the fields, or join bathers in the art-deco Brockwell Lido, an open-air swimming pool. Those with children can have fun riding a miniature railway, located in the north-eastern part.


The park works daily until dusk. Get directions.

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Local experience at Borough Market.
The HMS Belfast in London

HMS Belfast

The HMS Belfast is the pride of the British Navy, having served the British fleet for 32 years. It participated in combat battles against fascist Germany, accompanied Arctic convoys delivering supplies to the USSR and fought in the Korean War. Today it is a floating naval museum, with expositions dedicated to marine life and the ship’s war history. Visitors are allowed to peek into engine rooms or gun turrets, whilst getting an idea of life aboard the cruiser during WWII and the Cold War.


The museum ship is open every day. Get directions.

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Shopping in Cecil Court in London

Cecil Court

Cecil Court is a small pedestrian street of shops selling books and prints. It is one of the oldest streets in the London Covent Garden area, founded around the end of the 17th century.


The street is known for some interesting facts. For example, Mozart lived here during his grand tour through western Europe. Cecil Court also became the prototype of Diagon Alley, the street where the characters from the Harry Potter books were buying everything for study. Get directions.

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The Chiswick Gardens in London

Chiswick Gardens

The Chiswick Gardens were developed as the private garden of the Chiswick House, built in 1729 for Richard Boyle, Earl of Burlington. After his trip to Rome, Boyle was so impressed with the architecture that upon his return he decided to build a Palladian-style villa with a palace garden, like he had seen in Rome. Throughout the park you can see copies of antique sculptures, vases with flowers, as well as a beautiful crystal palace with a collection of camellias. To visit the villa, book your tickets online.


The gardens are open daily and free of charge. Get directions.

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Gray's Inn Gardens

Gray's Inn Gardens

Gray’s Inn is a beautiful educational complex that conveys all the splendor of 17th-century English architecture. It is one of the four Inns of Court in London. The court is an oasis of rest, with tidy green lawns, flowerbeds and beautiful trees. Students often sit down in the grass, and at times you can even see lawyers in gowns passing from one building to another.


Please note that the gardens are open to the public only from 12h to 14:30h on weekdays. Get directions.

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The London Eye

The London Eye

The London Eye is a ferris wheel on the banks of the Thames river, that was built to celebrate the Millennium. It has 32 transparent capsule cabins, each of which can accommodate up to 25 people. The wheel completes a full ride in 30 minutes and during this time you will enjoy London from all sides. On sunny days you can even see Windsor Castle that is more than 30 km away.


Check out the official website for opening hours, prices and more visitor info. Get directions.

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Shopping in Harrods London

Harrods (Department Store)

Harrods is probably the most famous department store in London, located in a magnificent 7-story building in Knightsbridge. There are about 350 boutiques here, mostly of luxury brands. You can also choose among 30 restaurants and coffee bars.


See the official website for more information about the brands and restaurants. Harrods is open every day. Get directions.

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Kensington Palace

Kensington Palace

Kensington Palace has served as the residence of young royalty for 300 years. Here the future Queen Victoria spent her youth. Princess Diana lived here with her husband and children. Today it is the official residence of Prince William and Kate Middleton. Despite its rather simple facade, inside it hides magnificent exhibits dedicated to the life of British monarchs. Of particular note is the collection of Lady Di dresses, in which she appeared at various events.


The palace is open every day. Get directions.

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London King's Cross

London King's Cross

King's Cross is one of London's largest train stations, designed in 1852. In addition to its magnificent architecture, thousands of tourists rush here to take pictures at the magic platform 9¾. It was described by Joanne Rowling in a series of books about the young wizard Harry Potter. Filming also took place here. After that, an art object of a cart with suitcases and an owl’s cage appeared here. If you are a fan, be sure to check out the gift shop dedicated to the wizarding world. Get directions.

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Piccadilly Circus

Piccadilly Circus

Piccadilly Circus is the brightest and busiest corner of the historic Westminster, with arrays of neon lights marking the entrance to London’s entertainment district Soho. The centerpiece of the square is the Shaftesbury Memorial Fountain, often mistakenly believed to represent Eros. Piccadilly owes its name to the tailor Robert Baker, who made a fortune selling the fashionable piccadill collars. In 1612 he bought some land here and built a house on it, which later became known as the Piccadilly Hall. Get directions.

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Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park

Tower Hamlets Cemetery appeared in the East End area in 1841 and was intended primarily for working-class people. Since 1966 new burials were prohibited, as the cemetery had to be turned into a park. What remains today is a very atmospheric cemetery woodland, with wildlife and historic graves all over the place. One of the most famous tombs is the grave of Dr. Rees Ralph Llewellyn, who performed autopsy on Mary Ann Nichols, generally considered as the first victim of Jack the Ripper.


The cemetery park is open 24 hours a day. Get directions.

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The British Museum

The British Museum

The British Museum is the central historical and archaeological museum of Great Britain, founded in 1753. It was based on private collections of earl Robert Harley, the physician Hans Sloane and the antiquarian Robert Cotton. Here you will find artefacts from excavations carried out by the British Empire in Mesopotamia, Greece, Egypt and Italy. Highlights include the magnificent Parthenon ruins, the Rosetta Stone, as well as one of the largest collections of graphics and drawings by Michelangelo, Raphael, Leonardo da Vinci, Albrecht Dürer, Rembrandt and William Blake.


The museum is free of charge and can be visited every day. Get directions.

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Find a place near the Tower Bridge.
Berkeley Square Gardens

Berkeley Square Gardens

The small park on Berkeley Square contains some of the oldest trees in London, planted in 1789. When the Duke of Berkeley sold most of his land in this area to the Duke of Devonshire, he asked not to build up this piece of land, so his view from the window wouldn’t get ruined. The agreement has still been upheld, as Berkeley Square remained a pleasant green corner. Get directions.

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Monument to the Great Fire of London

Monument to the Great Fire of London

The Monument is dedicated to the devastating fire that started on the night of September 2, 1666, in a bakery on Pudding Lane and lasted for four nights and four days. The fire burned eighty percent of London – more than 13 thousand residential buildings, 87 churches, including St Paul's Cathedral and government buildings. About 80,000 people were left homeless, and no one knows precisely how many died. The 62-metre Doric column stands exactly 62 meters west to the place where the fire started.


Visitors can climb the monument any day for a panoramic view over the area. Get directions.

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Covent Garden Market

Covent Garden Market

Covent Garden Market is one of the oldest and most popular shopping areas in London. The primary place of trade here is the Apple Market, which started operating in the Middle Ages, selling fruits and vegetables. Today you can buy here all sorts of everyday gifts like postcards or handmade trinkets, as well as more expensive pieces, such as interior items, paintings and sculptures. Those who want to update their wardrobe will also have plenty to choose from in Covent Garden.


The market is open every day. Visit the official website to learn more about the shops. Get directions.

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Shopping Near the Old Spitalfields Market in London

Old Spitalfields Market area

Away from the busy shopping streets, this area will be a great place for a relaxing shopping experience. Among the shops here, you will find fashion of small cutting-edge brands, but also boutiques of Chanel, Dr. Martens, Toni & Guy and other famous brands. Also, we suggest visiting the actual Old Spitalfields Market for some extra creative vintage ideas for your wardrobe. Get directions.

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Holland Park in London

Holland Park

Until 1952 the grounds of Holland Park were privately owned, and belonged to the Holland House. Today you can see the ruins of this Jacobean house, which was badly damaged during WWII. A magnificent detail of Holland Park is the traditional Japanese Kyoto Garden, as guarded by beautiful peacocks. Unlike many other green areas in London, the vegetation in Holland Park looks quite lush and wild, making it a great place to get lost and relax.


The park is open daily until dusk. Get directions.

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Portobello Road in London

Portobello Road

Portobello Road is a meandering narrow street that runs through the entire Notting Hill neighborhood. The residential street dates from the Victorian era and is particularly known for its little colorful houses and its antique market on Saturdays. One of these colorful houses was the first London home of the famous writer George Orwell. Find it at 22 Portobello Road – get directions.

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Westminster Bridge

Westminster Bridge

Westminster Bridge was built in 1862 replacing an old stone one. It is the oldest crossing on the Thames in London centre. Distinctive features of Westminster Bridge are its graceful lanterns and convenient descents towards the Thames embankment, from where you can take stunning photos with the Big Ben or the London Eye. Due to its proximity to all the central sights, it is always lively on Westminster Bridge. Get directions.

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Soho Square Gardens in London

Soho Square Gardens

Soho Square is a small lawn sided by mature trees and shrub planting. It feels like an island of peace, away from the hustle and bustle of Oxford Street, although it can get pretty crowded here on warmer days, with people relaxing on the grass. The hut in the middle of the square is a place of legends, is it a tunnel to Buckingham Palace? You can never be sure, but we take it as a shed for gardening tools, built in 1926. Get directions.

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Shopping at Savile Row in London

Savile Row

Savile Row has earned its reputation for tailor-made clothing, which began in the 18th century. This tradition has continued up to this day. Come here to visit famous brands such as Anderson & Sheppard, Bernard Weatherill, Huntsman, Kilgour, Norton & Sons, Richard Anderson, Richard James, and Timothy Everest. Your perfect suit is waiting behind these doors. Get directions.

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The Sherlock Holmes Museum

Sherlock Holmes Museum

The Sherlock Holmes Museum on Baker Street 221B has existed since 1990 and is a popular attraction for fans of the famous detective created by Arthur Conan Doyle. The house-museum resembles the flat of Sherlock Holmes and is furnished precisely as you know from the books. Inside you will be able to relive the amazing stories of the detective, greeted by his housekeeper and encountering legendary objects such as the violin and the pipe.


The museum works daily and admission is paid. Get directions.

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Brixton Market in London

Brixton Market

Brixton Market is located in one of the most multicultural areas of London, and this is certainly reflected at the marketplace. You will see here a bright and colorful mixture of African and Caribbean cultures, as embodied in the more than three hundred stalls where they sell traditional vegetables and fruits, herbs and spices, organic products as well as delicious street food. In the adjacent covered arcade, it’s possible to score an outfit or a cup of coffee in one of the small cafés.


Brixton Market works daily. Check out the official website for more detailed info about the market. Get directions.

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Buckingham Palace Gardens

Buckingham Palace Gardens

Unlike the nearby Royal Parks of London, the Buckingham Palace Gardens are generally closed to the public. However, when the palace is open in August and September, visitors have access to parts of the garden at the end of their tour. If you manage to get here, you will see beautiful and well-groomed fields and magnificent old trees, like mulberries from the time of James VI. If you are lucky, you will also meet the royal pink flamingos.


Have a look at the official website to plan your visit in summer. Get directions.

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The St Martin-in-the-Fields in London

St Martin-in-the-Fields

The St Martin-in-the-Fields was built in 1724 in neoclassical style and named after Saint Martin of Tours. The first church in his honour appeared here already in the 13th century, located in the fields between Westminster and the City. In the beginning of the 20th century, the crypt of the St Martin offered a place for the homeless, during WWII it served as a bomb shelter, and today it is for you, as it houses a unique café, hidden away from the city bustle.


You can visit the church any day, free of charge. Get directions.

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The Design Museum in London

Design Museum

The Design Museum is located in the three-story building of a former banana warehouse. Its permanent exhibition is dedicated to the history of design, from the beginning of the 20th century to the present day. While discovering the museum, you can even try to design your own car or print something on a 3D printer. In addition, the museum tells the stories of some icons in the world of high fashion like Vivienne Westwood, Christian Louboutin and Christian Dior, and innovators in the field of design like David Chipperfield or Zaha Hadid.


The museum works daily and is free of charge. Get directions.

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Waterlow Park in London

Waterlow Park

Waterlow Park used to be the private estate of Sir Sydney Waterlow which he generously presented to the public in 1889. The park was fully refurbished in 2005 and is now a hugely popular public space with a kitchen garden, an orchard, a play area for children and many wide, open spaces. Waterlow Park also boasts a variety of wildlife, including ducks, bats, herons, woodpeckers, hedgehogs, bees, frogs and butterflies.


The park is open daily till dusk. Get directions.

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Shopping in Bond Street in London

Bond Street area

Bond Street is a legendary shopping street in London Mayfair, flanked by flags of luxury brands. All around Bond Street you will find stores of the world’s most prestigious fashion brands, such as Burberry, Chanel, Dolce & Gabbana, Jimmy Choo and Louis Vuitton.


The numerous Royal Warrant Holders signs on doors of stores here, mean that the owner is an official supplier of the Royal Court. Get directions.

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The Mall

The Mall

The Mall is the main ceremonial street of the country and the principal road to the royal residence of Buckingham Palace. Once people used to play a game called pall-mall (similar to croquet) on the fields of this area. This classical lawn game eventually named two streets in central London – The Mall, and directly parallel the street Pall Mall. On weekends and on public holidays The Mall is closed to traffic. Get directions.

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The Old Operating Theatre Museum

The Old Operating Theatre Museum

The Old Operating Theatre Museum is located in the attic of St Thomas' Church in Southwark, where St Thomas' Hospital was originally located. The museum of today can be divided in two parts. One of them is a repository of traditional remedies and medicinal herbs, where you can see drugs as used by medieval monks. Second is the operating theatre itself, with a surgical table in the middle of the amphitheatre, from where students followed the operation. It is the oldest operating theatre in the UK, dating from 1822.


The museum works daily and admission is paid. Get directions.

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The Royal Academy of Arts in London

Royal Academy of Arts

The Royal Academy of Arts is the oldest association of artists in England, consisting of an academy and a library, an exhibition hall and a museum with a permanent collection. It was founded in 1768 by King George III. The museum exhibits works of artists and sculptors from the 18th century to the present day. Special exhibitions are organized every year, where you can see and purchase works of young artists and famous ones.


The museum can be visited free of charge, every day. Get directions.

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Finsbury Park in London

Finsbury Park

Finsbury Park locates in the middle of a busy area and big roads. It is a nice mixture of alleys with tall old trees, formal gardens with flower beds, and open grounds where you can find an athletics field, football courts and a skatepark. If the weather is good, you can also rent a boat and enjoy a ride on the lake.


The park is open daily until dusk. Get directions.

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Shopping at Brompton Road in London

Brompton Road

Brompton Road is a nice mixture of high fashion and affordable brands. Here you will see stores like Pinko or Guess neighbouring Zara and Topshop. The area gets busier towards Knightsbridge, where the luxurious department store Harrods and other high-fashion boutiques are located. Get directions.

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The Marble Arch in London

Marble Arch

The Marble Arch is a triumphal arch designed by John Nash in 1827. The structure was initially erected on Mall Street as one of the main gates of Buckingham Palace. During an expansion of the palace in 1851, the arch was relocated to end up near Hyde Park. The arch is made of white Carrara marble and it is easy to notice some similarities with the famous Arch of Constantine in Rome. Get directions.

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Alexander Fleming Laboratory in London

Alexander Fleming Laboratory

The laboratory-museum of Alexander Fleming is where you’ll get to see the very room where the scientist made his historic discovery of penicillin. A compact exhibition with pharmaceutical gear, photos and animations tells you about the life and work of the scientist. The entire picture reveals the amazing story about his accidental discovery of the very first antibiotics.


Located inside St Mary's Hospital, the museum is open from Monday to Thursday between 10h and 13h. Please note that the entrance is paid. Get directions.

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Shopping in Burlington Arcade in London

Burlington Arcade

The Burlington Arcade is an elegant shopping passage which opened in 1819 – as such it is the oldest of four shopping arcades located around Piccadilly. The well-known passage is a calm and pleasant covered gallery of high-end boutiques selling exclusive accessories, antique silverware and fashion.


Visit the official website for more information about the boutiques. Burlington Arcade is open daily. Get directions.

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Local experience at Harrods.
Shopping on Church Street in London

Church Street / Alfies

Church Street is a great choice for anyone looking for antiques. Here you can find everything from trinkets to magnificent antique furniture. Located on the same street is the Alfies Antique Market, a large indoor antiques and vintage market.


Alfies Antique Market is open from Tuesday through Saturday from 10h till 18h – visit their official website to learn more about the dealers. Get directions.

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Green Park in London

Green Park

The Green Park is the smallest of the Royal Parks of London. And although it cannot boast of beautiful ponds or famous monuments, it is perfect for relaxing while exploring the city. They say that once King Charles II had picked some flowers here and gave them to a woman. His wife got so angry because of this, that she ordered all flowers to be removed from the field. Since then there is not a single flower bed anymore in the park.


Note that the park is open till dusk. Get directions.

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The Royal Air Force Museum in London

Royal Air Force Museum

The Royal Air Force Museum is located in the former Hendon Aerodrome in north London. The exposition tells the story of aviation in Great Britain and the development of the Royal Air Force. Its collection boasts more than 150 aircraft, starting with biplanes from WWI and ending with modern fighter jets. Those who wish to test their pilot skills are invited in the hall with aircraft simulators.


The museum is open every day and free of charge. Get directions.

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Shopping at Kings Road in London

King's Road area

In this part of King's Road, you will be greeted by a mix of luxury boutiques side to side with mainstream shops. King’s Road is a fancy place for shopping, with independent designers offering an amazing choice of exclusive clothes. Also if you were looking for cosmetics or specialty stores, King's Road is worth a try.


Have a look at the official website to get introduced to the shops here. Get directions.

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Regent's Park

Regent's Park

Regent's Park is the most classic of London's royal parks, with strict alleys, geometric-shaped flower beds, and neatly trimmed bushes. But, besides this, you’ll find big old trees, a beautiful boating lake and a huge number of flowers – more than 400 varieties of roses alone. The park is excellent for romantic walks, exercising and playing tennis, or watching outdoor theatre at the Open Air Theatre.


Please note that Regent's Park closes at night – have a look at the official website for further information. Get directions.

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The National Maritime Museum in Greenwich

National Maritime Museum

The National Maritime Museum houses the most important collection in the world dedicated to the maritime history of Britain, which consists of more than two million exhibits. Among them are works of marine painters, maps, manuscripts and official records, models and schemes for building ships, scientific and navigational instruments, and much more.


The museum is open every day and free of charge. Get directions.

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The Southbank Centre Market in London

Southbank Centre Market

There’s always a nice market around the Southbank Centre, London’s multi-dimensional arts centre. Every day of the week, you will find a cute little book market on the Thames riverside. And around the weekend, the food market behind the Southbank Centre attracts all kinds of foodies, from avid meat-eaters to true vegetarians. Stalls offering beers, cocktails, delicious coffee and tea make the little festival complete.


The food market is held from Friday through Sunday, starting around noon until 18-20h. Visit the official website of the Southbank Centre Food Market for the latest news. Get directions.

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Ruskin Park in London

Ruskin Park

Ruskin Park bears the name of the famous English writer John Ruskin, who lived nearby between 1823 and 1871. Since 1907 the park has been a little gem for the people living in Denmark Hill, offering walking trails, sports fields, a playground and a picturesque little pond. The park’s highlights include an 18th century portico, a classic bandstand and a labyrinth garden.


Please note that the park closes at night. Get directions.

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The Guildhall

The Guildhall

For centuries the Guildhall has been the administrative centre of London, with its Great Hall used for trials. The impressive structure was built in 1440. As found out in 1988, there used to be a large Roman amphitheatre on this site – the ruins can be accessed from the Guildhall Art Gallery. This gallery exhibits many Victorian works, from a collection of thousands of paintings and a library with over two hundred thousand books.


The Guildhall is open every day and free of admission – check out the official website for further visitor info. Get directions.

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The Wallace Collection in London

The Wallace Collection

The Wallace Collection refers to a beautiful house filled with magnificent pieces of art, all bequeathed to the state in 1897 following the will of Sir Richard Wallace. One condition was made, that the entire collection should go on public display with nothing added or removed. The fine collection consists of paintings by Rubens, Titian, Rembrandt and other famous masters. Here you will see wonderful examples of European weapons and armour, porcelain and ceramics, furniture, sculptures and miniatures, making up a total of about 5,500 exhibits.


The museum is open every day and free of charge. Get directions.

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Bethnal Green Garden in London

Bethnal Green Garden

Bethnal Green Garden is a little garden on the territory of the Bethnal Green Library. It has good facilities for playing football or tennis, nice shady trees and even some palms. You may also notice squirrels running around, so don’t forget to bring some nuts. Near the northern gate you’ll find the Stairway to Heaven memorial, dedicated to the victims of the Bethnal Green Tube Disaster that happened during WWII, when 173 people died rushing to the underground station.


The garden is open all day. Get directions.

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Westminster Cathedral in London

Westminster Cathedral

Westminster Cathedral is one of the main Catholic churches in England and Wales and the headquarters of the Roman Catholic Church in Britain. It was built in 1903 in a unique neo-Byzantine style with its high bell-tower dominating the surrounding buildings. Its interior is made of over a hundred different types of marble. The nave is decorated with columns of green marble, extracted from the same quarries that supplied marble for Istanbul's Hagia Sophia.


Visiting the cathedral is free of charge, and for about € 8 you can go up the tower. Get directions.

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The Brunswick Square Gardens in London

Brunswick Square Gardens

The neighborhood of Bloomsbury is notable for its garden squares. The London planetrees growing on Brunswick Square are considered one of the oldest in the city. Here you will often find students sitting in the grass, or people simply chilling on the shaded benches of this little green oasis.


The gardens are open to the public during daylight hours. Get directions.

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Shopping in Clapham in London

Clapham

The Clapham shopping area is a fairly quiet place where you can peacefully walk among small colourful shops without crowds of tourists. Here you will mainly find small boutiques of local brands, interspersed with some mass-market brand stores. Shopping here means a good choice of clothes, shoes, perfumes and accessories. Get directions.

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The Admiralty Arch in London

Admiralty Arch

The Admiralty Arch was built by the order of King Edward VII in honour of his mother Queen Victoria in 1912. Through its existence, it has been used for government offices and social housing. Gradually, the arch fell into decay. Recently it has been leased for 99 years to an investor who plans to open a luxury hotel here. Pay attention, in one of the driveways, a stone human nose protrudes from the wall. The nose was placed there by the artist Rick Buckley in 1997, in a campaign against the practice of video surveillance of citizens. Get directions.

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Greenwich Park

Greenwich Park

The vast territory of Greenwich Park can be traced back to Roman times. With iconic views over the Thames and beautiful landscapes, the scene is ideal for a picnic. It looks especially beautiful in spring, when azaleas and rhododendrons bloom here. Along with the famous Greenwich Observatory, you will find Roman ruins here, as well as a famous old oak that has been there already since the 12th century.


The park is open during the day, but the exact hours vary per month. Get directions.

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Hampton Court Palace

Hampton Court Palace

Hampton Court is one of the oldest residences of the English kings, whose construction began in 1515. Generations of Tudors lived within its walls, and the castle still keeps the secrets of Henry VIII. They say that the ghosts of his murdered wives roam here at night. In addition to mysteries, the palace will delight visitors with a tour through the living rooms of Henry VIII, the Tudors kitchens, and its beautiful formal gardens.


The museum is open daily. Get directions.

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The Jack the Ripper Museum in London

Jack the Ripper Museum

It is impossible to imagine the Whitechapel area in eastern London without the horror stories of Jack the Ripper. This serial killer murdered his victims throughout this area for many years. If you are not too sensitive and interested in solving crimes, be sure to visit the Jack the Ripper Museum. Here you will find lots of material about the investigations and his victims, and surprising details of his methods.


The museum is open daily and the entrance is paid. Get directions.

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Shopping in Lambs Conduit Street in London

Lamb's Conduit Street

Lamb's Conduit Street is a real gem, still hidden from the eyes of most tourists. Here you can get lost in a number of small local shops that have everything! Handmade leather goods and shoes, magnificent woolen coats, books, wine and much more. The small and cosy cafés here are perfect for a break. Get directions.

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The Peter Harrison Planetarium in London

Peter Harrison Planetarium

The Peter Harrison Planetarium is currently the only planetarium in London, opened in 2007. It is located inside a 45-ton bronze truncated cone, tilted to one side. Learning about the secrets of outer space takes place in a private atmosphere, as the planetarium is designed for only 120 people. Visitors are invited to choose one of the several proposed programs about our solar system, as narrated by Royal Observatory astronomers.


The planetarium works daily and admission is paid. Get directions.

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Shopping in the Oxo Tower Wharf in London

Oxo Tower Wharf

The eccentric Oxo Tower on the banks of the Thames river is one of the best places in London to look for the unique works of local designers. Handmade jewellery, ceramics, designed furniture as well as innovative lighting are a selection of the contemporary gifts that you can find here. Another reason to make a stop at the wharf, is the panoramic restaurant and bar at the 8th floor of the building.


Visit the official website for an overview of the designers and their opening hours. Get directions.

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Stay near Borough Market.
Hampton Court Park

Hampton Court Park

Hampton Court Park consists of borderless meadows and sloping hills particularly beloved by deer, and a number of Baroque gardens directly surrounding Hampton Court Palace. The palace gardens are all well-groomed and formal, but themed differently. There is the central Privy Garden, the exotic Lower Orangery Garden, the Pond Garden that once kept the fish for Henry VIII’s table, as well as the Secret Garden – of course, we cannot share any information about that one.


Hampton Court is open daily from 10h to 18h and a ticket is required. Get directions.

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The O2 Arena

The O2 Arena

The O2 Arena was built at the end of the 20th century. Initially, it was an exhibition hall, called the Millennium Dome, in which various educational events were held in honour of the new millennium. The arena received its new name O2 Arena in 2005, when it turned from an exhibition hall into a huge musical complex hosting world-famous concerts.


Have a look at the official website to see what’s on. Get directions.

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Shopping in Mount Street in Mayfair

Mount Street

Mount Street is an elegant street in Mayfair, where you can find perfectly tailored suits and dresses, the finest jewellery and the most exclusive shoes. All fancy, but pricey. Many of the brands featured here are based in the UK or are creatively led by British designers. Pringle of Scotland, Roksanda, Simone Rocha, Loewe, Nicholas Kirkwood are some of the best-known boutiques here. Get directions.

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The Foundling Museum in London

The Foundling Museum

The Foundling Museum is a very unusual place dedicated to the Abandoned Children's Hospital, founded by Thomas Coram. The museum’s collection contains unique exhibits related to the treatment and education of abandoned children as of the 18th century. Among the museum's patrons were the composer George Frideric Handel, who bequeathed a fair copy of his famous oratorio Messiah to the hospital, and the artist William Hogarth, whose works can also be found in the museum.


The museum is closed on Mondays and admission is paid. Get directions.

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Trafalgar Square

Trafalgar Square

Trafalgar Square is the centre of London. Until the beginning of the 19th century, royal stables were located on this site. John Nash had the first hand in redeveloping the area into the square it is today – a massive project that was dedicated to the victory of the British fleet in the Battle of Trafalgar. In the centre of the square shines the 52-m Nelson’s Column, commemorating Admiral Nelson who had led the British to victory. Trafalgar Square is not only a concentration of architectural monuments and museums, but also a traditional location of Christmas events. Get directions.

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V&A Museum of Childhood

V&A Museum of Childhood

The V&A Museum of Childhood is a branch of the V&A museum dedicated to the early life of monarchs. By 1974, its collection of children's items had grown to such proportions that it was decided to establish a separate museum dedicated to their childhood. Here you will find about 20,000 children's toys with 8,000 dolls, among which there is a doll from 1300 BC. In addition to dolls, there are soldiers and board games, teddy bears and magnificent dollhouses.


The museum is open every day and free of charge. Get directions.

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Royal Botanic Gardens Kew

Royal Botanic Gardens Kew

Kew Gardens is a UNESCO-protected site filled with greenery, beautiful buildings and greenhouses. Its 121 hectares not only give space for 30,000 different plants, but also a Treetop Walkway, a Water Lily House and a Bamboo Garden. Landmarks include Kew Palace, the largest Victorian glasshouse in the world, and the 50-metre Great Pagoda from 1792.


The gardens are open every day, and admission is paid. Get directions.

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The Brunel Museum in London

Brunel Museum

The Brunel Museum is dedicated to the engineer Marс Brunel, who invented a method for digging tunnels as well as a tunnelling shield that was required in the actual construction. This was a revolutionary development, thanks to which the world's first tunnel under a navigable river was dug. The museum is located in a small old building, where steam engines were constantly pumping water out of the tunnel. Unusual exhibits tell you about the work of Sir Marс Brunel and his son, another outstanding engineer, Isambard Kingdom Brunel.


The museum works daily and the entrance is paid. Get directions.

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Shopping in Canary Wharf in London

Canary Wharf

Canary Wharf boasts not only high-rise buildings and offices, but also a large shopping center with a relaxed atmosphere. Here you will find a wide range of stores, including international chains and luxury boutiques, homeware stores, cosmetics shops, bookshops and electronics stores. Little coffee bars and lunchrooms provide an opportunity to refuel.


Check out the official website to explore the full list of stores. Canary Wharf is open every day. Get directions.

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Columbia Road Flower Market

Columbia Road Flower Market

Every Sunday, Columbia Road, on the East End, turns into a blooming oasis. Bright exotic flowers and bulbs, trees and seedlings, gardening supplies, potted plants and many other things are sold in street shops and surrounding stores. It is best to come early to avoid crowds, or rather late for better deals.


The flower market works on Sundays from 8h to 15h. Check out the official website for more information about the market. Get directions.

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The Lincoln's Inn Fields in London

Lincoln's Inn Fields

Lincoln’s Inn Fields is one of the largest green squares in London. It was founded early 17th century, and it takes its name from the nearby Lincoln’s Inn Law School. The shaded park is a very peaceful place, nice for jogging, and excellent for playing tennis. Who would have thought that this place was a public execution site under the Tudors and Stuarts?


Please note that the park closes at night. Get directions.

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Shopping in Gabriels Wharf in London

Gabriel's Wharf

Gabriel’s Wharf is one of the places to look if you want to buy something original from local designers. In this little enclave on the banks of the Thames, you will find craft shops and lovely boutiques selling clothes, hats, accessories and handmade products. The wharf can also be nice for having a drink or a bite. Get directions.

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Geraldine Mary Harmsworth Park

Geraldine Mary Harmsworth Park

The Geraldine Mary Harmsworth Park is a little green space surrounding the Imperial War Museum. The park contains plenty of mature trees, wide lawns and picnic tables, sports courts and some other attractions. One is the Tibetan Peace Garden, as opened in 1999 by the Dalai Lama. It is a tranquil space, perfect for contemplation and reflection.


The park is open all day. Get directions.

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Handel & Hendrix in London

Handel & Hendrix in London

Handel and Hendrix is an exhibition uniting the stories of two great musicians. They lived in neighbouring houses with a difference of 200 years. Handel lived here in the 18th century when he wrote his famous oratorio Messiah. The phenomenal guitar player Hendrix settled in the neighbouring house in 1969. According to an urban legend, Hendrix repeatedly told his friends that “the spirit of Handel” came to him at night.


Please note that the museum is closed on Sundays and the entrance is paid. Get directions.

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Kennington Park in London

Kennington Park

Kennington Park is a place with a long history. Once part of Kennington Common, the park became famous for the Chartists demonstration for workers’ rights in April 1848. A few years later, the place opened as a public park. Here locals like to sunbathe on the central lawn or relax on one of the benches in the shade of big old trees. The park also contains an Old English Garden, as well as good facilities for sports and leisure.


Please note that Kennington Park closes at night. Get directions.

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Find a place near Richmond Park.
The London Zoo

London Zoo

The London Zoo opened in 1828 and is the oldest scientific zoo in the world. But age is not the only thing it can boast of. Here you will find more than 19,000 animals and over 700 species, with the larger animals in relatively spacious and interesting enclosures. Not to miss are Penguin Beach, Gorilla Kingdom, the Land of the Lions, or its rainforest with the world's largest collection of reptiles. To the delight of everyone, the zoo is open every day! Get directions.

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The Mansion House in London

Mansion House

The Mansion House is the official residence of the Mayor of London. The idea of building a permanent accommodation for the mayor came up after the destruction brought by the Great Fire of 1666, but the house was not erected before 1758. The house with its Palladian facade treasures majestic state rooms and an impressive 17th century Dutch art collection.


The Mansion House can only be visited on a guided tour with pre-booked tickets – visit the official website for further information. Get directions.

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The Mile End Park in London

Mile End Park

Mile End Park is a relatively young park, created on a long piece of land that had been left devastated after WWII bombings. The linear park alongside Regent’s Canal is particularly popular for exercising. You’ll find here football and basketball pitches, a climbing wall, a BMX track and comfortable winding jogging paths.


Mile End Park can be visited any time of the day. Get directions.

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Facade of the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

Best 10 free museums of London

London is a magnificent metropolis, where life is in full swing among its almost 9 million people. The capital of Britain has a long history, starting as a Roman colony and growing into one of the most exciting metropolises in the world. One but. It is still very expensive here.


Among all the magnificent skyscrapers and buzzing taxis, you might think that it is almost impossible to afford entertainment here – but free museums come to the rescue!


In London there's museums for every taste, from modern to historical. And the good news is that a large number of eminent museums is state-owned, which means that entry is absolutely free of charge, regardless of citizenship or age... Read more

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Southwark Park in London

Southwark Park

Southwark Park is a pleasant and neat park that has something for all. The park contains mostly plane trees and treasures a rose garden, a boating lake and a bandstand from 1884. Children will love the playground where they can find swings, a slide and other small rides. For sports enthusiasts, there are tennis courts, football pitches as well as an excellent track for running.


Please note that Southwark Park closes at night. Get directions.

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Museum of London

Museum of London

The Museum of London houses more than 1 million exhibits telling about life in the city from ancient times to the present. Here you will see objects from the times of the Roman Londinium, some of which not found until they appeared coincidentally during the construction of new buildings. Many of the museum objects have been supplied by Kensington Palace and the Guildhall – the most famous of them, is the golden coach that belonged to the Lord mayor.


The museum is open every day and is free of charge. Get directions.

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Grosvenor Square in London

Grosvenor Square

When Grosvenor Square was laid out in the 18th century by Sir Richard Grosvenor, it was initially only the residents of the surrounding houses who were admitted there. Most of them were rich aristocrats and diplomats. After the square opened to the public in 1948, it became one of the most beloved green squares in central London. The atmosphere here is nice and calm, with mostly families and children present. In the centre of the square you will see a statue of Franklin D. Roosevelt. And it was John Adams, the 2nd US president, who lived some years at Grosvenor Square 9. Get directions.

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Shopping at Cheapside in London

Cheapside

Cheapside is a common English street name, essentially meaning "market place". Since ancient times, there have been markets here. Today the area of Cheapside finds itself in the middle of the London City business district. You will find mostly clothes stores and large international chains here.


At the western end, you will find the shopping mall One New Change, which offers some restaurants as well. The mall is open every day – have a look at the official website for more info about the stores here. Get directions.

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Madame Tussauds London

Madame Tussauds

Madame Tussauds London is the largest and most famous wax museum in the world, located in a remarkable building that was previously home to the London Planetarium. Movie stars, presidents and prime ministers of various countries, businessmen, kings and queens – they are waiting for your pictures!


Many are ready to stand in line for the opportunity to take pictures with their idol, but note that the admission fee is rather high, with online tickets selling for about € 30. Madame Tussauds is open every day – check out the official website for further visitor info. Get directions.

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Russell Square in London

Russell Square

Russell Square is one of the beautiful square gardens of the Bloomsbury district. The lively square contains flowerbeds, plenty of benches and a fountain in the very centre. Undoubtedly the most impressive building facing the square is Hotel Russell, a magnificent example of a Victorian grand hotel – the building is easily recognizable by its facade of red terracotta.


Russell Square can be visited any time of the day. Get directions.

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Ragged School Museum in London

Ragged School Museum

At the Ragged School Museum you’ll get the opportunity to see the true East End of the 19th century. Here in 1877, the first free school for children from poor families was founded. For more than 30 years, many were enabled to receive basic knowledge here. The museum tells about the education and lifestyle of Victorian England, as well as famous legends and stories about ghosts of the area.


The museum is open every Wednesday, Thursday, and the first Sunday of each month – admission is free. Get directions.

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The Household Cavalry Museum in London

The Household Cavalry Museum

The Household Cavalry Museum is dedicated to the history and modern life of the Royal Guards. The Royal Cavalry was created in 1661 and still continues to guard the Queen during ceremonies throughout the country. You will be able to observe the exercises of the ceremonial regiment of the Royal Horse Guards, visit the working stables and children can try on uniforms.


The museum works daily and admission is paid. Get directions.

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Syon Park in London

Syon Park

Syon Park is best known for the 16th century Syon House, which has been home to the Dukes of Northumberland for already more than 400 years. The 80-hectare Syon Park consists of tidal water meadows and fields, but also a 40-hectare garden with an arboretum. The garden contains over 200 species of rare trees.


For visiting Syon Park and Syon House you will need a valid ticket – have a look at the official website for the latest info. Please note that visiting is possible only from March to October. Get directions.

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Sir John Soane's Museum in London

Sir John Soane's Museum

The John Soane Museum is the former home of the outstanding architect Sir John Soane. His house is richly decorated with his private art collection. You will find here architectural fragments of the old Palace of Westminster that burned down in 1834, Chinese and Peruvian ceramics, Indian furniture, ancient Roman artefacts and much more. The picture gallery includes paintings by Canaletto, Hogarth, Turner and fifteen drawings of Piranesi.


Please note that the museum is open from Wednesday to Sunday and is free of charge. Get directions.

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Victoria Park in London

Victoria Park

Victoria Park is London’s first public park, opened in 1845 on the lands of Bishop Bonner. As one of the favorite places for political rallies in London, Vicky Park became commonly known as the “People’s Park”. The 86-ha park remained popular through time, with its ponds, extensive lawns and sports pitches, or its Rose Garden and its Old English Garden. Children will appreciate the playgrounds, the petting zoo and the splash pools here. Of architectural significance is the 19th century drinking fountain, decorated in the Neo-Gothic style.


Please note that the park closes at night. Get directions.

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Smithfield Market in London

Smithfield Market

The name of the Smithfield Market comes from the time when the market still found itself in a wasteland, a “smooth field”, with farmers offering their produce. It has always been a place of trading cattle and animal products. The large supply and high quality of the meat and poultry offered here, makes the Smithfield Market popular with wholesalers and restaurateurs.


Please note that the Smithfield Market flourishes in the early morning, and therefore visitors are advised to come as early as 7h, to find the full range of stalls open. The market hall is closed on weekends. Have a look at the official website for further visitor info. Get directions.

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St Helen's Bishopsgate in London

St Helen's Bishopsgate

St Helen’s Bishopsgate was built in the 12th century, initially belonging to the nuns of the Benedictine order. This is the only monastery preserved in London that survived even the Great Fire, although it did suffer more recently, from the IRA terror attacks in the 1990s. Today the church is completely restored, looking especially attractive due to the unusual contrast with the ultra-modern skyscraper of Mary Axe in the background.


St Helen's Bishopsgate is open to visitors on weekdays, and church service can be attended on Sundays. Should you plan to visit the church on a weekday, don't hesitate to call the reception to plan your visit – see the official website for further info. Get directions.

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Two Temple Place in London

Two Temple Place

The luxurious Two Temple Place is a Gothic-style 19th-century mansion once owned by Viscount Astor. Unlike many other museums, this gallery is quite hidden and not so widely known – although the place is reportedly popular for private parties. The fancy house with its chic interiors and uniquely carved wooden decorations opens to the public on the days of its temporary art exhibitions. Check out the official website to see what's on. Get directions.

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Wimbledon and Putney Commons

Wimbledon and Putney Commons

Wimbledon and Putney Commons consists of 470 hectares of open space. The vast green wilderness is made up of Wimbledon Common, Putney Heath, Putney Lower Common and the Richardson Evans Memorial Playing Fields. With all sorts of woodland, scrubland, heathland as well as nine ponds, the area is home to a wide variety of animal and plant life.


As an unfenced area, the commons are open to the public 24 hours a day. Get directions.

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Wembley Stadium

Wembley Stadium

Wembley Stadium was built in 2007 on the site of the renowned old Wembley Stadium that was opened in 1923. It hosted the finals of the 1948 Olympic Games, the 1966 World Cup as well as numerous other major sporting events and concerts, including the legendary Queen concert in 1986. Today, the legacy is being kept alive with this grand new stadium hosting both sporting events and large-scale concerts.


For a tour through this arena with 90,000 seats, visit the official website of Wembley. Get directions.

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Local experience at Camden Lock.

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